6 Things You NEED to do to Land a Job

Over the past 5 years that I’ve worked with students who are searching for jobs, I’ve started to notice some common trends between those that find jobs and those that don’t.  You might think to yourself that one candidate had better grades, more experience, or better connections and that’s why they got the job.  Sometimes that’s right, but a lot of times it’s wrong.  There’s so much more to getting a job than being the “ideal candidate.”

Below are my main tips on how you can be successful in finding a job, no matter what your background is, hang-ups are or challenges you face–

  1. Open up your mind to new possibilities. Like the old adage “don’t judge a book by its cover,” neither should you judge a job by its obscure company name, job title or anything else until you’ve done your research.  Try it and you just might like it.
  2. Get over your major.  You have multiple options on how you can apply your degree.  Figure out where you want to live, an industry you want to work in, something. Have you noticed that a lot of job descriptions focus on skills more than specific degrees?  If you haven’t, you aren’t looking in the right places.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       ….which leads me to….
  3. Stop focusing on large job boards. Go into a targeted group on LinkedIn or consider joining a professional association. Many employers like to focus on targeted groups rather than post on Monster or Careerbuilder. It makes sense.  Go where you’re more likely to find a successful match.
  4. Get out from behind the computer screen. A recruiter once told me “I hire people, not paper.” Recruiters are human beings that like to get to know candidates. Put yourself out there and give them a call. Come to a career fair. Attend an event you know they will participate in and introduce yourself. Don’t be afraid.
  5. Show that you’ve got some sense.  iF u can’t type a sentence correctly and uze crazy emoticons 🙂 all the time, youre going to turn off a lot of people.  (Note that I intentionally typed that horrific sentence.  My English Teacher Mother is rolling in her grave as you read this.)
  6. Act like you like what you’re interviewing for.  I don’t care if you’re interviewing to scrape horse doo at the circus, you need to act like you like the job.  If you can’t even muster a smile or a small laugh during the interview, they’re going to think that you could care less about the job.  If you aren’t enthusiastic now, why would you be a positive force on the job??? No employer wants to work with Debbie Downer.

That’s it!! Simple enough, right??  What do you think?

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To Employers that Tweet Out Jobs

Recently I’ve noticed quite a few businesses tweet out job listings.  Sounds like a good idea right?  In theory yes, but I’ve found that many of these links are broken or those that have good links lead to job descriptions that don’t match what the tweet indicated the job would be. If your followers click on your link to find out more information and are taken to something completely unrelated, why would they continue to follow you or read your content?

When I looked a little deeper into the company accounts, I found that some had a large amount of followers that were spam accounts, competitors, or people that were not remotely qualified for the positions they were tweeting about.

So what should we take away from this?

  1. Make sure your tweet is clear and aimed to your target audience. Have a job title, location & what you’re looking for clearly indicated to make your followers more inclined to click on your links.
  2. Search for the leaders in your industry and follow them to find potential employees. Follow the leaders followers too. This will make your potential prospects at least aware of your account.
  3. Consider sending a DM (direct message) directly to leaders in the field to see if they will retweet your information or to those you think could be good prospects for the job.

Ultimately, you want to give people a reason to follow you.  If your message is consistent and is related to what your 140 character profile states, you will emerge as someone worthy to follow.

To follow or not to follow…you never want that to be the question.