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I’m the Right Person in the Wrong Job

Before you start thinking that I don’t like where I work, know that the point of this article is to talk about what it’s like to feel that you are in the “wrong job” while still enjoying what you do. Let me make it clear that I LOVE my job and the people that I work with. My goal after college & graduate school has never wavered (once I figured it out): to help college students achieve their true potential. My way of doing that is to make sure that students can easily find a job after graduation by working in collegiate career services.

BUT, I watch videos, read blogs and research careers and what people should be doing with their career all the time. That made me start thinking…am I doing what I should be doing? Am I the A professional or B professional like the one you hear about in the below video?

When I first started my career, I remember feeling like I wasn’t smart enough for my job because I felt different than all of the other Career Consultants Counselors around me. It wasn’t that I was treated differently or felt like I wasn’t good enough for the job, rather I wasn’t sure if I was good enough. I was told by my supervisors and co-workers that I was doing a good job, but I just couldn’t quite believe it. How could I believe it if I wasn’t sure what a “great” Career Consultant was? Is there one way how to do it or one standard?

That’s when I came to this conclusion:

No, there isn’t one way how to be “good” because I didn’t factor in my personality. I may not be a “true” counselor in the sense that my master’s was not focused in counseling, but I help students ALL the time, in a different way.  Different doesn’t mean bad if it achieves the same results, and it did. So why worry?

I definitely wouldn’t feel the way I do today without the encouragement of my colleagues who “brought” me with them.  I hope this story helps to inspire you to believe in yourself and remember how great YOU are at your job. Sometimes we have to look into ourselves from time to time and believe that we’ve got what it takes. After all, results don’t lie.

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Finding your voice…social media voice that is

Determining Your Voice

I think one of the hardest parts of social media for professional or business use is determining your “voice.” What do I mean by voice? I’m talking about the feeling you give to your readers about who you are and what you (or your business) represent. It’s your personality. Your “it” factor. It’s what makes you different that anyone else posting about the same topic.

I’ve struggled with this personally myself. I currently coordinate the UGA Career Center’s Twitter, Facebook & Pinterest accounts and figuring out my voice on those accounts versus my personal/professional Twitter & Facebook accounts has been difficult. Being in a field where teaching professionalism is your job also makes it hard. Personally, I love entertainment news and following humorous accounts on Twitter and Facebook, but is it appropriate for the Career Center? Is it appropriate for any “serious” business to delve into pop culture and try to sound that way?

I’m still on the fence. On one hand, you don’t want to step too far to where you start losing credibility. On the other, you run the risk of being to stiff or boring. The key thing you need to ask yourself is who’s listening to me and who is most likely to interact with me on social media? The answer may be different depending on the site.

The companies that I find to be most successful answer questions directed towards their accounts quickly and politely. If their focus isn’t creating conversation with consumers, you either need to be funny or informative with a dash of random. The dash of random is what humanizes  you and your business. It may sound silly, but without it you lose something. Businesses are trying so hard to figure out a way to monetize social media and by doing so they miss the point of why social media was created: to create real relationships. Many of us choose our friends because we have something in common with them and they let us in. They let us see both the good and bad aspects of their personalities.

Do I think businesses should expose the bad parts of themselves? No, not necessarily. However, if all you’re doing is posting information that can be found directly on your website or Googled, you’ve missed the point and even if you have a lot of followers, you don’t have an audience. You’re a part of the noise.

Iconic Photographer Steve McCurry Talks Blogging and WordPress

Steve McCurry has great advice and tips that can apply to your blog. The stunning pictures are a bonus! Happy face.

The WordPress.com Blog

Steve McCurry, a professional photographer and author of several photography books, shares his reasons for why he blogs on WordPress.com. His iconic photo, Afghan Girl, graced the cover of National Geographic and was named one of the 100 Best Pictures of the magazine. McCurry has been recognized with some of the most prestigious awards in the industry, including the Robert Capa Gold Medal, National Press Photographers Award, and an unprecedented four first prize awards from the World Press Photo contest, to name a few.

You are a world-famous photographer. Why do you blog?

Steve: Who would even dream 20 years ago that we would even have the internet? Clearly the internet is changing the landscape of publishing, news, and entertainment. There are countless channels on television, infinite content on the internet, and stimuli literally everywhere we turn. . . . There is so much competition. My blog is just my way of…

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